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Re: [libreoffice-accessibility] Display bindings


Hi :)
If it's trivial and makes it more consistent with other apps then it sounds
like a really good option.  Such a good option that it worries me why it
hasn't been done already.  Maybe there is a good reason?

There have been a lot of positive changes in LibreOffice accessibility over
the last year so maybe that is a factor?  Also maybe other apps (such as
Firefox) have settled down to being more consistent with each other?

Would such a change create problems for existing users who are used to
using whatever keyboard short-cuts are currently being used in
LibreOffice?

If so is it likely to be easy to give people the choice?  At the moment
there is already a setting in the
Tools - Options
that allows people to choose between "LibreOffice dialogues" and "native
dialogues".  Would something like that be necessary to try to keep the
existing users happy?  If so would it be easy?

Regards from
Tom :)




On 12 December 2014 at 15:28, V Stuart Foote <VStuart.Foote@utsa.edu> wrote:

Niklas,

Sure, we could  make a distinction as Microsoft does, between the "access
key" and a "keyboard accelerator/shortcut-key".

But, as you know the majority of AT support in OOo and derivatives like
LibreOffice is structured around the accessibleRole assigned to an
object--and from that comes accessibleName  and "access key" attributes if
any.

For objects that have VCL or UI based "access keys" attributes, those are
exposed to the UNO Accessibility API as the object is navigated, and the
respective native accessibility bridge handles it--as the user has
configured.

Menu items and GUI widgets (buttons, spinners, etc.)  that do not have an
"access key" assigned will sound either the objects name or it's tooltip.
Those that do, will also sound the name and the "access key".

With the shift of most of the GUI to UI, most "access keys" no longer are
<Alt>+letter combinations. Rather they are just the letter -- and that
might
need to be adjusted at some point.

But global "keyboard accelerator/shortcuts-keys",  normally structured with
<Ctrl>+letter, or <Ctrl>+<Shift>+letter are not otherwise exposed to AT as
they are not associated with the UI object.

Anyhow, looking at a Firefox session, there they have simply adjusted the
objects accessibleName  and are appending the global shortcut-key to the
name!   Nothing special.  The "access key" associated with the accessible
object is exposed with AT.  It is exactly the same with Adobe Reader.

So, we could do the same, pretty trivial as it is only label changes, and
some coordination with the l10n/i18n teams.

Stuart



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