[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [libreoffice-l10n] Weblate instance for testing purposes


Hi all,

I've been using Weblate for several years for other projects I maintain, mostly F-Droid, OsmAnd and Debian-Installer, and I kind of have liked the experience.
What I've liked the most is the ability to setup Weblate to deliver the translations in a multitude of file-formats for download.
The UI is mostly sensible, not too much waisted whitespace as has been en vogue lately.

A couple of negative points though (which I will surely investigate later and discuss with the Weblate-team):

How on earth can I download/upload ALL the files in a project? Maybe it's there somewhere, but I haven't found this critical (for me) feature.

Since a recent Weblate upgrade (perhaps 3-5 months ago), validity-checks when uploading a file are way too strict and non-verbose; if there's ONE faulty string in a file, NONE of the other well formatted strings are accepted and you only get a message like: "Please fix errors in the form. Error in parameter method: This field is required."

Before the upgrade you would get the plain output from msgfmt or whatever script used to verify the file, with indicators on which lines there are errors. And other correctly formed strings got accepted.

What hurts me most are the false-positives concerning newlines in PO-files, PO-editors generally arrange very long lines in multiple shorter lines inside the same msgid/msgstr, which I think is accepted in the gettext-standard. Now those strings are not appended but get a newline symbol between them.
Another is the warning/fuzzying when the source and the translation are the same: I can see in the LO Weblate-instance some 30+ strings with this warning, for which I can remove the warning manually. Nothing tells me why these strings are considered so dangerous and not some of the other strings where the source and the translation are the same. Worst of all, next week they may be fuzzied again for the same reason, when the Weblate-files are read again from source.

I suspect that these problems stem from a combination of new validity-checks in latest Weblate along with files which are not gettext-native (for example iOS-strings), or even that their version of gettext is different from mine ;-)

Haven't had time to investigate this properly, my points mostly concern a couple of files I've been fighting with (for example OsmAnd-iOS https://hosted.weblate.org/projects/osmand/ios/is/) but also what I saw in the LO Weblate-instance.

Just thoughts,
Sveinn í Felli


Þann 28.8.2019 08:37, skrifaði sophi:
Hi Michael,

Le 27/08/2019 à 18:07, Michael Wolf a écrit :
Why are there untranslated strings for Upper Sorbian and Lower Sorbian
on Weblate? All master strings are translated on Pootle for both languages.

The template has been updated

And, will Weblate the translation platform in future, note more Pootle?

This is what we have to decide. Pootle is no more developed and
maintained so we have to find another tool for the future. Weblate seems
the best tool to suite our needs (off line/on line translation). This is
why we are testing it at the moment.
Cheers
Sophie



--
To unsubscribe e-mail to: l10n+unsubscribe@global.libreoffice.org
Problems? https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/mailing-lists/how-to-unsubscribe/
Posting guidelines + more: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Netiquette
List archive: https://listarchives.libreoffice.org/global/l10n/
Privacy Policy: https://www.documentfoundation.org/privacy

Privacy Policy | Impressum (Legal Info) | Copyright information: Unless otherwise specified, all text and images on this website are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. This does not include the source code of LibreOffice, which is licensed under the Mozilla Public License (MPLv2). "LibreOffice" and "The Document Foundation" are registered trademarks of their corresponding registered owners or are in actual use as trademarks in one or more countries. Their respective logos and icons are also subject to international copyright laws. Use thereof is explained in our trademark policy.